The Town of Jackson estimates a SPET period of approximately 6 months would generate the $6 million needed to stabilize and protect ONLY the public infrastructure currently at risk.  No public funding will be used to subsidize commercial property owners.  These property owners will be responsible for mitigation of slide impacts on private property.

The SPET ballot was unanimously approved by the Jackson Town Council and County Commissioners as the best way of financing the necessary repairs.  SPET funding is temporary funding, with 2/3rds of these collections being paid for by visitors and guests.

Click on the following link to listen to The League of Women Voters Forum held at the Teton County Library on August 10, 2016.   A robust question and answer session with Town Manager Bob McLaurin and Town Councilman Don Frank fielded questions from a panel and public. 



WHY IS IT NECESSARY TO FIX?

  • The slide is still moving at ¼ inch each month (it speeds up in wet weather)
  • U.S. Geological Survey report:  there is a possibility for catastrophic failure of the hillside
  • The slide compromises public safety and our economic well being
  • A catastrophic failure of the hillside could:
    • Threaten the local economy and tourism in Northwest Wyoming
    • Threaten the 12” water main line to West Jackson
      • Destroy a portion of West Broadway
      • Flood buildings and residences in West Jackson
      • Loss of water: drinking & fire suppression in West Jackson
    • Threaten the sewer system




WHAT WILL THE MONEY BE USED FOR?

  • Planning, Engineering & Constructing a system to stop landside
  • Restoring public infrastructure
  • Acquiring land and/or easements
  • Relocating and replacing impacted utilities


HISTORY OF THE SLIDE:

All the development on the north side of Broadway between Scott Lane and WY 22 sits on the remnants of a colluvium mass wasting and ancient landslides that occurred approximately 150,000 years ago.  During this event the volcanic basaltic andesite, which overlaid the sedimentary layers, slid down to what would 150,000 years later become West Broadway Avenue.
 
Through a series of events over the past 60 years, this ancient landslide was reactivated.   Between the dates of 1967 and 1968 WYDOT removed 52,000 cubic yards of material from the hillside.   Prior to this time, Broadway went up and over a hill comprised of ancient slide debris.   WYDOT excavated the toe of this slide path in an effort to flatten Broadway motorists (both residents and visitors) smooth access into east Jackson.   This is the same level Broadway that motorists, pedestrians and bikers utilize today.  

Between the dates of 1963 through 1980 private quarry operations removed 15,000 cubic yards.  Much of the material excavated from the hillside during this time was utilized to pave roads throughout the Town of Jackson.  These are the same roads that are used by residents and visitors alike.  

In total, since 1963, approximately 83,500 cubic yards of material have been extracted from the Budge Drive hillside.   Of this amount over 80% was removed by WYDOT and private quarry operations prior to 1980.   Much of the materials extracted from this hillside was utilized to construct and pave roads throughout Jackson.   The roads constructed and paved are still utilized today by residents and visitors alike.    

   


EMERGENCY ACTIONS THE TOWN OF JACKSON HAS TAKEN TO ADDRESS THE SLIDE:

In April and May 2014 the Town of Jackson implemented a series of emergency mitigation actions to protect public safety and infrastructure. These actions significantly slowed landslide movement. The cost of these actions was $1.3 million. Emergency actions included:

  • Issued emergency evacuation notice for residences and businesses.
  • Constructed 3 temporary buttresses to slow slide movement.  These buttresses protected the Sidewinders Parking Structure and Budge Drive access. This involved importing 7 million pounds of structural fill (2400 CY).
  • Drilled 7 test wells to obtain an understanding of the local geology and to help monitor ongoing slide movement
  • Reestablished temporary water and sewer service to residences on hillside. (fire flow has not yet been restored).
  • Developed 3 concepts for alternative access for residences on the hill.
  • Developed a plan to stabilize the landslide.  This plan included unweighting the top of the hill, construction of shear key and permanent buttresses.  This plan will restore a Level of Safety Factor of 1.2 on the western portion of the slide. The Town Council approved this plan on October 27, 2014.
  • In November 2015, Budge Drive was widened and regraded to provide narrow two-way traffic and relocated upper Sidewinders access for parking.
  • The Town of Jackson obtained temporary drainage easements to install a temporary drainage plan which includes graded swales, concrete structures and culverts, designed to collect and discharge storm water runoff. This work diverted water from the head of the scarp and helped to stabilize slide movement.
  • The Town continues to work with the Hillside commercial partners, Walgreens and the residences to reach agreements to construct the project.    


THE TOWN OF JACKSON'S POLICY OBJECTIVES REGARDING THE LANDSLIDE:
Restoring Public Safety, Health & Welfare

  • Protect Public Safety
  • Protect Public Infrastructure and Assets
  • Understand the local geologic condition
  • Develop a plan to mitigate the landslide
  • Fund that portion of the slide repairs that protects public infrastructure and assets


Text Size

A A A A A

Language